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Author Topic: TCVD the secret TCL feature?  (Read 3114 times)

Offline 2byte

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TCVD the secret TCL feature?
« on: March 30, 2011, 10:34:27 AM »
[rave]
A few days ago I discovered that the tcvd boot param can be used for more than Qemu disk images! You veterans probably know all about this, but it's not apparent to us new guys and gals. The only mention of it seems to be in the FAQ at tinycorelinux.com and that is in reference to Qemu.
   It's a really neat feature that opens up interesting possibilities. Just use dd to create an empty file, mkfs.ext2 to create the file system and presto; you have a virtual disk image that tinycore and microcore can use for frugal installs. Multiple flavors of small TCL to play with on one partition! Everything else needed is already built into TCL.
   In fact I now have a very minor and surprisingly easy remaster of microcore that can boot from CD and use a tcvd along with a tc.swp swap file stored on a ntfs partition. And everything works! Blazing fast too. As a bonus; no aufs or unionfs needed. Just the ticket for a special purpose system I need.
[/rave]

This deserves a whole page on the wiki IMHO.

Hats off to Mr. Shingledecker, the extension maintainers, and everyone else involved.
 

Offline hiro

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Re: TCVD the secret TCL feature?
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2011, 12:58:22 PM »
I agree, tcvd seems pretty useful. If I understand this correctly one might either access tinycore from windows in virtualbox or boot to the full speed native tc with your method.
Or is it also possible to let virtualbox directly access a proper partition under windows?

Offline maro

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Re: TCVD the secret TCL feature?
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2011, 05:20:53 PM »
Or is it also possible to let virtualbox directly access a proper partition under windows?

It's possible (in principle) by using the VBoxManage internalcommands createrawvmdk command, but I can only recommend that to users who really understand what they are doing (so read up all documentation you can find). Anyone else should better use share folders etc.