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Author Topic: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?  (Read 10581 times)

Offline Ulysses_

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How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« on: November 24, 2010, 01:50:30 PM »
1. Is it possible to block specific images such as adverts or whatever image the user dislikes to see?

2. Can specific scripts be blocked (not all scripts but specific ones coming from other sites, eg googleAnalytics)?

3. Can flash supercookies/LSO's that normally remain stored forever making it possible to track and identify you and know all flash movies you've ever seen, be automatically deleted at the end of a session?

4. Can Opera download flash videos into .flv files that can then be edited with video editing tools?

Offline tinypoodle

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2010, 02:22:46 PM »
1. Menu of Page: "Block content..." or edit urlfilter.ini

2. I could imagine that might be possible with user javascript.

3. Add home/tc/.macromedia to /opt/.xfiletool.lst

4. flash videos do get downloaded into browser cache and/or /tmp, but deleted when page is closed.
"Software gets slower faster than hardware gets faster." Niklaus Wirth - A Plea for Lean Software (1995)

Offline Ulysses_

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2010, 02:41:20 PM »
Do you recommend opera.tcz or opera10.tcz?

GetFlash10.tcz says "you must have oss started".  Does it not work with alsa? 

Offline gerald_clark

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2010, 02:46:17 PM »
You could use alsa-oss.tcz .

Offline curaga

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2010, 02:56:31 PM »
The url filter blocks everything, which is rather great IMO. I have facebook blocked, gets rid of all that "like" spam on blogs and sites.
The only barriers that can stop you are the ones you create yourself.

Offline Ulysses_

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2011, 12:40:52 PM »
1. Menu of Page: "Block content..." or edit urlfilter.ini

I'm having difficulty with this.  In the UK version of google here:

http://www.google.co.uk

How do you block just the google picture?  This picture disappears when you right click and select "Block content..." so you cannot select it.  And reappears afterwards.

Offline tinypoodle

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2011, 06:12:42 PM »
That logo doesn't seem to behave like a "regular" image as it also does not produce any context menu.

You could try to inspect it with dragonfly: Alt-t > a > d

Edit: However, the logo would disappear simply by disabling images.

The logo on http://www.google.com/webhp?hl=en behaves as any image, context-menu and subject to content blocking.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2011, 06:21:08 PM by tinypoodle »
"Software gets slower faster than hardware gets faster." Niklaus Wirth - A Plea for Lean Software (1995)

Offline Ulysses_

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2011, 06:24:43 PM »
Then it's something we'll have to live with for now.

You might be interested in the following, many security-conscious firefox users have it installed, especially TOR users, it comes with hacker-favourite live CD backtrack:

Quote
Quote
2. Can specific scripts be blocked (not all scripts but specific ones coming from other sites, eg googleAnalytics)?

2. I could imagine that might be possible with user javascript.

NoScript for firefox is it.  And now there is an Opera equivalent, BlockIt:

http://www.ghacks.net/2010/02/02/opera-noscript-alternative-blockit/

Offline Harnessmaker

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2011, 06:14:38 PM »
Replying to you from Opera 11.01, but I think the following Opera features have remained constant for a while and will probably apply to your version:  

If you use F12, the quick preferences menu will appear, to let you turn off a lot of features, plus a link to edit preferences for specific sites.

Using the main menu>tools>preferences will give you wider selections of similar choices. (Caution: the shortcut for this in Opera is normally Control+F12, but AVOID this shortcut in tc, or you will end up at Desktop 12 wondering what happened to your browser!!!)

I would also recommend going into  Opera>Tools>Appearance>Toolbars and select the Status Bar and View Bar, you'll then have a quick way to move in and out of displaying images or not, and to switch from "Author Mode", which includes style sheets, etc., to User Mode which is basically a text browser that you can choose to enhance in many ways through the Opera>View>Styles menu.

And once you know Opera well and want to get even more ambitious, you can try typing opera:config in the address bar to see the thousands of configuration options available.  She's very, very configurable....

If I sound very chauvinistic about this, it's because I'm on a dialup 56K connection, and the ability that Opera provides to turn off unneeded features has been a lifesaver.  With User Mode, and script and images turned off, and with Tinycore's own incredible speed, and adding Opera Turbo in the 11.01 model, browsing on 56K seems virtually as fast as broadband, so you can understand why I'm devoted!!  

The further advantage, of never having seen a graphical ad or had an unwanted pop-up in the past three years of intensive browsing, leads me to feel that Tinycore and Opera are a wonderful combination.

There are a few downsides, in the form of some sites, such as eBay that have some features (but not many) that aren't Opera compatible, but on the whole I've found that the extra time required to learn such a highly configurable browser has been repaid to me many times over.  And now having Tinycore to underly it is just wonderful....

A security note:  If you want to update to the current version of Opera the day it appears (and updating  can be absolutely critical with browsers to avoid spoofing and fake certificates), you can do so in Tinycore by downloading the current bzip2 Linux version directly from Opera and installing it in your home directory.  

However you may want to consider that running it from /home/tc/ as I do, instead of as a .tcz would not be advisable unless you can make your backup read-only or remove it to protect it from accidentally backing up after risking contamination online, as otherwise you would be losing the "pristine state" which is so significant a benefit in tinycore extensions.  I find this is a compromise well worth making for my browser, but for any other use I would definitely stay with .tcz's.  However, you may well find it preferable to make a .tcz extension of it....

Opera, in it's most recent version it's a virtually self-contained package, needing only libxft and of course bzip2 for unpacking.  I do a clean boot, go directly to the download site, download it , get offline immediately, then in terminal as root, "bzip2 -d -c /home/tc/operaversionname.linux.tar.bz2 | tar -C /home/tc  -x" [allow some time here for the unpacking], and when the prompt returns, "su tc" to get out of root, cd into the directory Opera has created in /home/tc/ and run "./install", and follow the prompts.

Once you run Opera for the first time and configure it the way you want (NB: I always do this offline, so I can do a clean backup without online contaminations), close Opera before making your backup.  This way you avoid beginning with the "resume after a crash" dialog box when you restore from backup at boot.

Apologies for getting so carried away on this subject.  Hope some of it will prove useful to you.

Regards,  Harnessmaker
« Last Edit: April 11, 2011, 06:21:43 PM by Harnessmaker »

Offline tinypoodle

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #9 on: April 11, 2011, 08:45:52 PM »
Some observations:
That unpack command seems rather complex to me, I would simply
Code: [Select]
tar xf operaversionname.linux.tar.bz2and no need to use sudo.

Coincidentally yesterday I did install by a misclick in rox-filer, that then took me quite a while to clean up before being able to do next backup.
I could not see any advantage of using the install script in comparison to just starting opera out of the extracted dir with ./opera.
In case of extracting to permanent storage that would also mean that the same instance could be run from other Linux systems.
"Software gets slower faster than hardware gets faster." Niklaus Wirth - A Plea for Lean Software (1995)

Offline Rich

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #10 on: April 11, 2011, 11:24:37 PM »
You don't need alsa-oss.tcz, it runs with alsa.

Offline Ulysses_

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #11 on: April 13, 2011, 03:25:15 AM »
You don't need alsa-oss.tcz, it runs with alsa.

Can't hear anything with vmware hardware though.  Anyone got alsa to work in a vmware VM?

Offline tinypoodle

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #12 on: April 13, 2011, 04:55:54 AM »
You don't need alsa-oss.tcz, it runs with alsa.

Can't hear anything with vmware hardware though.  Anyone got alsa to work in a vmware VM?

I'd suggest you open a different thread for this subject as it seems rather to be an issue related to vmware than opera.

IMHO, attempting to run a full bells and whistle browsers with all its features under vmware sounds like a really bad idea to me regarding as well speed as resources usage.
"Software gets slower faster than hardware gets faster." Niklaus Wirth - A Plea for Lean Software (1995)

Offline Ulysses_

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #13 on: April 13, 2011, 02:11:30 PM »
Browsing in a virtual machine is prefered because of its extreme security*. So getting opera to fully function in a TC VM is very much desirable. Especially given TC is very economical in memory so you can run several instances of TC in isolation from each other.

* any infection cannot access private data in the host, cannot infect the host, and cannot exist after a vm reboot if nonpersistence is selected or if the vm is disposed of.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2011, 02:23:48 PM by Ulysses_ »

Offline Harnessmaker

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #14 on: April 13, 2011, 02:18:44 PM »
Some observations:
That unpack command seems rather complex to me, I would simply
Code: [Select]
tar xf operaversionname.linux.tar.bz2and no need to use sudo.

Yes, thanks.  Your command has unpacked the bzip2 Opera beautifully in /home/tc. 

The more elaborate command developed (courtesy of emelfm2) because, in order to save ram, I would normally be downloading the tar.bzip2 file to a usb, which is then mechanically write-protected.  The file is then unpacked by script into /home/tc/ by script at time of use. 

In this scenario, my efforts to have the the tar -x -f work have so far been blocked by the write-protect.

I'm very new to scripting, so suggestions will be welcome.

Regards,  Harnessmaker