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Author Topic: How does one use dCore?  (Read 6666 times)

Offline robintel

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How does one use dCore?
« on: February 02, 2014, 07:55:47 AM »
Hello,

I am new with this distro and I am having problems locating updated dCore usage information.

For instance, is it possible to get something as functional as TinyCore Plus using dCore? How?

Else, how does one install packages into dCore? I heard SCE is outdated and I see the folder no longer exists on the webserver.

Else, having booted from the ISO, I get the prompt, but it's not very useful. So, what can one do, for instance, to install Python, or Start X using framebuffer...

Thanks,
Robin
_________
Ro: Pentru că inteligența este un loc tare singuratic.
En: Because intellect is such a lonely place.

Offline Jason W

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Re: How does one use dCore?
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2014, 12:24:30 PM »
Hi,
dCore is available only as the 6MB dCore.gz or the 10MB iso image.  There is presently no CorePlus equivalent.  Though the tce directory can reside in RAM, it helps to use a writable Linux filesystem like a hard drive or flash device. 

The command "importsce" is what is used to fetch and install packages.  "importsce python" is the command to install python, when there are more than one package with very similar names, a menu of choices will appear.  SCE is the resulting package format, SCM was the one that was retired.  The importsce tool fetches Debian packages along with all their dependencies and combines them into one SCE file.  The command "loadsce" is what is used to install the package once it is imported. 

The package "xorg-all" is a meta package that would work for all supported video cards.  "Xprogs" and a window manager/desktop environment would make for an X session. 

Those are some of the basics.  Hope this helps and don't hesitate if you have any other questions. 

There is some info in the below directory, I will review it for outdated material as dCore development is often rapid.

http://tinycorelinux.net/5.x/x86/README/

EDIT:  I see Rich posted a link to some info as well in the below post, I will update it as well.

http://forum.tinycorelinux.net/index.php/topic,16440.msg99010.html#msg99010
« Last Edit: February 03, 2014, 12:27:17 PM by Jason W »

Offline cast-fish

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Re: How does one use dCore?
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2014, 10:29:45 AM »
so with dcore

do you see a list of packages available for building into SCE's  or not?

does "dcore" come with it's gui interface ready?   e.g.  "fluxbox"

say you want to have VLC on your computer

do you just type

"importsce vlc"

Vince.

Offline Jason W

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Re: How does one use dCore?
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2014, 12:38:35 PM »
Hi,

Type the command "importsce" and it will prompt you to enter the first letters of a package name, and a menu of similarly named packages will appear.  Enter "file" and 14 package names come up to choose from.

dCore does not come with it's gui ready, you have to import xorg, Xprogs, and a window manager.

And to import vlc, it is simply "importsce vlc". 

Offline cast-fish

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Re: How does one use dCore?
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2014, 03:42:59 PM »
ok thanks Jason

do you think it will work with "Ardour" music tool?

is "dcore" simply looking at the same repo's as what a debian OS would offer it's user?

thanks


Vince

Offline Rich

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Re: How does one use dCore?
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2014, 05:09:59 PM »
Hi cast-fish
Quote
do you think it will work with "Ardour" music tool?
Didn't Jason already answer that when he said:
Quote
Type the command "importsce" and it will prompt you to enter the first letters of a package name, and a menu of similarly named packages will appear.

Offline cast-fish

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Re: How does one use dCore?
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2014, 05:41:01 PM »
well it's a double question Rich

some repos don't offer that tool...some do

i am double thinking .....about "arm" repo's and 'x86" repo's..... but don't have much experience with it.

the second part of the question is

b) is a "dcore" user presented with the same repo's as what a tradition "debian OS user" would see?

V.

Offline Jason W

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Re: How does one use dCore?
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2014, 05:56:24 PM »
Vince,

It is simple to find out if a package is available in the Debian repo, or other repos that can be added.  "importsce ardour"  brought up the below menu of choices:
Code: [Select]
Select Package for ardour

         1. ardour
         2. ardour-i686

Enter selection ( 1 - 2 ) or (q)uit: 1
Do you want to import ardour? (y/N):

And yes, dCore uses Debian repos.   The default is the standard Wheezy main one, and others can be added.  If you are running x86, it will only fetch from the i386 repo.  Running arm, and only the arm packages are fetched.  The exception are packages with the "all" arch specification, as those packages are not arch specific.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2014, 05:59:03 PM by Jason W »

Offline cast-fish

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Re: How does one use dCore?
« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2014, 06:00:43 PM »
ahh right...

i see

So then Ardour will work. 

sorry but it's a grey area for me about repo's

Then the "arm dcore" repo would also give that similar result?

(without wanting to confuse anything.....because this is the x86 thread right)

V




Offline Jason W

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Re: How does one use dCore?
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2014, 06:05:41 PM »
Yeah, if the package is available for ARM, it will appear if using the ARM dCore.

One of the goals of dCore is for the behavior to be exactly the same across all arch's, currently armv7 and x86.   Both ports use the exact same scripts and code.

Offline cast-fish

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Re: How does one use dCore?
« Reply #10 on: February 04, 2014, 06:19:38 PM »
right .....thanks

i know another distro (the most popular ......almost) which certainly has the arm build of Ardour (.... it's the arm version of the distro too)

They have put Ardour together with some other audio tools .....and also the realtime Linux kernel. (all together with the Distro ) So it's kind of a custom remaster of that distro for a specific arm chip. (quad core samsung in this case)

"dcore" seems great.... if it works like you said.
dcore opens up lots more tools to the user than earlier versions of tinycore.

many thanks

V

Offline beerstein

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Re: How does one use dCore?
« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2014, 09:01:09 AM »
Hi - hope this fits in here?
When I used Allwinner A10 dCore today with a new kernel, set up for the cubietruck board, I recognized that the command:
$ importsce -b mc  ( as an example)

actually accesses standard debian wheezy packages and creates an TinyCore ARM .sce extension. -- Is this correct?

Does this mean that we can use the debian arm repo for our Allwinner dCore system?
t(w)o be(ers) or not t(w)o be(ers) that is the question

Offline Jason W

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Re: How does one use dCore?
« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2014, 09:22:55 AM »
Beerstein-

That is correct, the main Debian armv7 repo is what A10 dCore uses.  The base libraries of both x86 and A10 dCore were made from the contents of Debian packages, so fully library compatible with Debian Wheezy.

Importsce will make an SCE out of any package in Debian's repo on both arch's.

Offline beerstein

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Re: How does one use dCore?
« Reply #13 on: February 05, 2014, 09:39:07 AM »
thanx - will these A10 extensions work with my A20 cubietruck?
t(w)o be(ers) or not t(w)o be(ers) that is the question