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Author Topic: network interfaces config file  (Read 23189 times)

Offline 522690

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network interfaces config file
« on: July 18, 2011, 06:03:07 AM »
Hi, all.
Sorry for supid question
Where i can find network interfaces config file?

Offline beerstein

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Re: network interfaces config file
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2011, 06:25:06 AM »
Hi:
It is in /opt
I edit it once in a while to change settings.
But when you use the panel you can configure and it will
automatically updated.
t(w)o be(ers) or not t(w)o be(ers) that is the question

Offline 522690

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Re: network interfaces config file
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2011, 07:24:59 AM »
beerstein, you mean bootlocal.sh?

Offline curaga

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Re: network interfaces config file
« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2011, 08:06:43 AM »
If you mean the debian specific file, there is none.
The only barriers that can stop you are the ones you create yourself.

Offline hiro

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Re: network interfaces config file
« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2011, 08:47:04 AM »
First, there is the nodhcp bootcode, which you have to use if you want to bring up your interfaces with some kind of network manager you like.
There is also the network app which lets you set up your ethernet interface in a graphical environment.

Offline Rich

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Re: network interfaces config file
« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2011, 09:47:14 PM »
Hi 522690
If you open up control panel and click on the Network button you will be able to set your network
parameters. When you exit the network application it will create a script in the  /opt  directory, in
my case it created  /opt/eth0.sh. It also adds an entry to  /opt/bootlocal.sh  to call that script.

Offline beerstein

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Re: network interfaces config file
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2011, 06:26:30 AM »
beerstein, you mean bootlocal.sh?


the script acually is eth0.sh and it is menioned (listed) in bootlocal.sh
to keep the information inside the eth0.sh
I assume that if you have a second NIC you might have eth1.sh and so on...

522690 did you try to configure via cammandline using sudo ifconfig?
and then check the eth0.sh file
t(w)o be(ers) or not t(w)o be(ers) that is the question

Offline Rich

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Re: network interfaces config file
« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2011, 08:18:57 AM »
Hi beerstein
Quote
522690 did you try to configure via cammandline using sudo ifconfig?
and then check the eth0.sh file
If you are implying that  ifconfig  modifies  eth0.sh, it does not.

Offline beerstein

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Re: network interfaces config file
« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2011, 03:10:16 AM »
sorry I thought:
$ ifconfig eth0 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0

from the commandline would set the IP for eth0

So where does TC store the IP ?

Thank you
t(w)o be(ers) or not t(w)o be(ers) that is the question

Offline gerald_clark

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Re: network interfaces config file
« Reply #9 on: July 21, 2011, 05:58:54 AM »
The IP is not "Stored" anywhere.  It is just set in the driver/interface.

Offline netnomad

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Re: network interfaces config file
« Reply #10 on: July 21, 2011, 10:09:34 AM »
in tc and mc the dhcp-service connects to the network automatically, in most cases.

if i want to connect manually,
i use

$ sudo ifconfig eth0 192.168.1.1 up
to intialize the interface eth0

and
$ sudo ifconfig
to check the state of all my interfaces...
« Last Edit: July 21, 2011, 10:11:47 AM by netnomad »

Offline Rich

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Re: network interfaces config file
« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2011, 08:40:43 PM »
Hi beerstein
Yes,  ifconfig eth0 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0  at the command line will set the IP address to
192.168.1.1 for the current session. If you want that IP address to survive between reboots, that
is what the  /opt/eth0.sh  script is for. So if I understand your question, when you want to maintain
a constant IP address, it is stored in  /opt/eth0.sh  as part of the ifconfig command in that file.