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Author Topic: upload speed  (Read 2231 times)

Offline cast-fish

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upload speed
« on: March 27, 2012, 11:48:38 AM »
Hello

is it possilbe to improve your upload speeds?...( 1 megabyte/s is the speed of my phone line)

I already found a tool that makes my downloading 5 times faster and works.






http://download.cnet.com/Gigaget-Download-Manager/3000-2071_4-10503294.html


but how about accelerating my upload speed?

is there some kind of torrent system which can improve upload speeds
by splitting my song files into tiny fragments....rebuilding them at the server end?

i only found this one
http://www.ftp-unzip.com/ZipDeploy/

thanks

V.


Offline hiro

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Re: upload speed
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2012, 12:00:18 PM »
surely you're joking

Online gerald_clark

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Re: upload speed
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2012, 12:06:48 PM »
I thought that is what TCP does.

Offline cast-fish

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Re: upload speed
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2012, 12:12:43 PM »
Hello

uh....i am not trying to joke ...no   (i hope the post is not unwelcome)

will take a loot at TCP.

The other tools i mentioned some-how mirror the files that are being downloaded and
create many links to the single file....thus vastly improving speed. Ofcourse speed never
reaches above the 1 meg my line supports....but the downloading tool achieves the
exact maximum speed of my line on every single file that is downloaded. (where-as without the tool
some downloads can be much much slower)

I relize that uploading is a totally different thing....and can't be put into the same theory
as downloading....but i wondered what you may know?  (tcp)

thanks

V.

Online gerald_clark

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Re: upload speed
« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2012, 12:29:22 PM »
You are already using TCP.  The internet is TCP based.

Offline coreplayer2

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Re: upload speed
« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2012, 12:48:33 PM »
I wonder if cast-fish is referring to the hosting of tinycore ISO downloads provided by  http://distro.ibiblio.org??  I would agree is slow though not normally noticeable until you download the plus version.  Am sure the host is providing this support for a very reasonable fee so can't complain really.. 

 it is what it is, and we're grateful for the ibiblio.org support.




« Last Edit: March 27, 2012, 12:50:30 PM by coreplayer2 »

Offline hiro

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Re: upload speed
« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2012, 03:30:25 PM »
cast-fish hasn't understood the internet. That's for sure.  These tools are so last-century to me, I can't even believe it.

Offline cast-fish

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Re: upload speed
« Reply #7 on: March 27, 2012, 07:59:58 PM »
Hello

uh.... i am not sure what you mean.

My OP is simple and straight forward. The OP is a generic topic about uploading and
downloading of computer files to and from the internet using a home PC on a DSL connection.

I use a special tool for downloading files which increases the download speed by 5 times. Or more accurately, it sucks any file down to my desktop
at the full bandwidth that my DSL line supports(everytime). Without using this extra tool i find that 90 percent of my downloads are 5 times slower.

I was simply asking if you know about any "similar acceleration methods" to achieve similar results with the mechanism of uploading files...?

i realize that uploading is not in the same ball park as downloading but is
it even possible
to accelerate uploading of files from my desktop?

My DSL upload speed is a max of 1 megabyte/s. Perhaps if the uploaded files were first zipped at my desktop and then uploaded and unzipped at the server side.Some speed improvement is the end result?.

I had found a win32 tool that did just that...but wondered what other light you could shed on the topic of accelerating the uploading of files?

What i was thinking is that my remote machine at Amazon has 100mbps web connection....so if i zip my desktop files and upload them at 1mbps to my Amazon machine and unzip them there....then upload them from the amazon machine to where-ever at 100mbps

thx

V.


Offline hiro

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Re: upload speed
« Reply #8 on: March 28, 2012, 01:25:31 AM »
your machine or network is broken, get a computer expert.

Offline gutmensch

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Re: upload speed
« Reply #9 on: April 01, 2012, 02:10:30 PM »
We definitely need a "like button" functionality here, I liked some comments a bit although they were not very helpful. Shame on you :P

@cast-fish: I think the guys were just trying to hide their lack of knowledge about a good method to make your upload five times faster ;) And the point is, I don't have one either!
If I seem unduly clear to you, you must have misunderstood what I said. (Alan Greenspan)

Offline vinnie

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Re: upload speed
« Reply #10 on: April 01, 2012, 04:58:47 PM »
We definitely need a "like button" functionality here, I liked some comments a bit although they were not very helpful. Shame on you :P

+1, i'd like karma feature :)

Offline Rich

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Re: upload speed
« Reply #11 on: April 01, 2012, 08:44:11 PM »
Hi cast-fish
Quote
What i was thinking is that my remote machine at Amazon has 100mbps web connection....so if i zip my desktop files and upload them at 1mbps to my Amazon machine and unzip them there....then upload them from the amazon machine to where-ever at 100mbps
If there is some reason sending a compressed file to the final destination is not acceptable, then you might pick up
some speed sending it to an intermediate machine first. How much depends on what type of files you are sending.
If the files can't be compressed very much, you won't get much improvement. If you are sending a lot of files you
will probably reduce your transfer time by tarring them into one big file before compressing and uploading. How
much time this will save I can't say. If your goal is to free up you machine as quickly as possible, this is probably
the best you will do.
Now, if your goal is to get those files to their final destination as quickly as possible, and the site limits your upload
speed, that's a different issue. If the site allows you to make multiple connections and you are transferring more
than one file, you can start more than one transfer at a time. Here are some simple examples that address only
the transfer time, and don't take into account any other overhead.

You have 8 files that take 1 second each to transfer at 1Mb/Sec. The destination site limits you to 500Kb/Sec.
Sending the files one at a time would take 16 seconds.
Sending 2 files at a time would take 8 seconds.
Sending 4 files at a time would still take 8 seconds because you are limited by your machines 1Mb/Sec connection.

You have 8 files that take one second each to transfer at 1Mb/Sec. The destination site limits transfers to 500Kb/Sec.
Your files get compressed to half their original size.
Sending the files to the intermediate machine takes 4 seconds.
The intermediate machine sending 8 files at a time would take 2 seconds for a total of 6 seconds, 2 seconds less.

As I said, these are simplified examples which don't take into account compression/decompression time, tar/untar
time, and any other overhead that may come into play.

Offline hiro

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Re: upload speed
« Reply #12 on: April 02, 2012, 01:52:34 AM »
Nowadays you can send over 100 GB per day if you put a few micro sd cards in a plain old letter. Latency is about a day if both sides live in the same country, but multiple times faster than with your slow upload bandwidth.

Offline cast-fish

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Re: upload speed
« Reply #13 on: April 02, 2012, 08:37:28 AM »
Hello


well yes....Hiro...that is funny dude  ;D

some friends and myself have a lot of uploading to do....regularly...he is in Tunisia and is'nt the best phone lines there...

yes because the other tools work well under "wine"

well thanks very much for the "numbers" example here...it really makes sense. The situation with me is that it's large amounts of say 10 meg to 20 meg files going UP....it's a speed increase that is required....a raw speed increase.

V

Offline Rich

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Re: upload speed
« Reply #14 on: April 02, 2012, 09:37:56 AM »
Hi cast-fish
Quote
...it's a speed increase that is required....a raw speed increase.
I don't know what that means.

If the destination machine allows you to upload at 1Mb/Sec, that's the best you are going to do.

If the destination machine can also accept a compressed file, your transfer time will be reduced by the same ratio
your file size was reduced.

If the destination machine is capable of receiving date faster than 1Mb/Sec, but limits your connection speed,
see the examples above and do the math. Only multiple files will decrease the time to send the files to the
destination machine, and only if you can compress them enough AND there are enough files to offset the initial
upload time to the intermediate machine. Watch what happens with the second example if you try to send the
same amount of data, but it consists of only 4 files:

You have 4 files that take two seconds each to transfer at 1Mb/Sec. The destination site limits transfers to 500Kb/Sec.
Your files get compressed to half their original size.
Sending the files to the intermediate machine takes 4 seconds.
The intermediate machine sending 4 files at a time would take 4 seconds for a total of 8 seconds, no time is saved.

There's no magic here, it's all in the numbers. The bottom line is you will never be able to transfer data any faster
1Mb/Sec * (1 + (percentage your data is compressed by / 100)), that is your maximum effective transfer speed.