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Author Topic: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?  (Read 6787 times)

Offline tinypoodle

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #15 on: April 13, 2011, 11:24:21 AM »
Browsing in a virtual machine is prefered because of its extreme security*. So getting opera to fully function in a TC VM is very much desirable, as TC is very economical in memory so you can run several instances of TC in isolation from each other.

* any infection cannot access private data in the host, cannot infect the host, and cannot exist after a reboot if nonpersistence is selected).

How would that compare from a security aspect to a chroot?
My estimation would be that vmware would be way more resource hungry, slower and also much more complicated to configure.
"Software gets slower faster than hardware gets faster." Niklaus Wirth - A Plea for Lean Software (1995)

Offline Harnessmaker

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #16 on: April 13, 2011, 11:28:14 AM »
3. Can flash supercookies/LSO's that normally remain stored forever making it possible to track and identify you and know all flash movies you've ever seen, be automatically deleted at the end of a session?

Two methods which I know work generally, although you'd have to test them to be certain in this case:

1)  To lose them at shutdown:  Opera versions and install methods vary as to where they place the cache files.  You can discover their location with Opera>MenuBar>Help>AboutOpera, in order to make sure that  files you don't want backed up are correctly listed in your /opt/.xfiletool.lst.

2)   If you want to lose them during a session:  Opera>MenuBar>Tools>DeletePrivateData is a tool for removing cookies, cache, etc. during a session, and it also makes possible the deletion of vulnerable email passwords before opening dodgy mail.  You can configure what is to be deleted.

(Bug note:  Opera versions before the most recent have to be closed and reopened for passwords to be effectively removed by this method.  Bug is fixed in 11.01.)
« Last Edit: April 13, 2011, 11:50:53 AM by Harnessmaker »

Offline Harnessmaker

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #17 on: April 13, 2011, 11:36:40 AM »
Opera, in it's most recent version it's a virtually self-contained package, needing only libxft and of course bzip2 for unpacking.

It seems I'm mistaken here:  Only the libxft.tcz will be needed, as the capacity to unzip bzip2 files is already in TinyCore's base.

Offline tinypoodle

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #18 on: April 13, 2011, 12:21:55 PM »
Some observations:
That unpack command seems rather complex to me, I would simply
Code: [Select]
tar xf operaversionname.linux.tar.bz2and no need to use sudo.

Yes, thanks.  Your command has unpacked the bzip2 Opera beautifully in /home/tc. 

The more elaborate command developed (courtesy of emelfm2) because, in order to save ram, I would normally be downloading the tar.bzip2 file to a usb, which is then mechanically write-protected.  The file is then unpacked by script into /home/tc/ by script at time of use. 

In this scenario, my efforts to have the the tar -x -f work have so far been blocked by the write-protect.

I'm very new to scripting, so suggestions will be welcome.

Regards,  Harnessmaker


Code: [Select]
tar xf operaversionname.linux.tar.bz2 -C ~/
"Software gets slower faster than hardware gets faster." Niklaus Wirth - A Plea for Lean Software (1995)

Offline danielibarnes

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #19 on: April 14, 2011, 11:03:19 AM »
You don't need alsa-oss.tcz, it runs with alsa.

Can't hear anything with vmware hardware though.  Anyone got alsa to work in a vmware VM?

OSS works fine in VMware Player, and alsa worked after I ran alsaconf.

Offline Ulysses_

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #20 on: April 14, 2011, 11:59:05 AM »
Could you post your .vmx please, that makes OSS work fine? 

Offline Harnessmaker

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #21 on: April 14, 2011, 12:30:22 PM »
3. Can flash supercookies/LSO's that normally remain stored forever making it possible to track and identify you and know all flash movies you've ever seen, be automatically deleted at the end of a session?

Two methods which I know work generally, although you'd have to test them to be certain in this case:

1)  To lose them at shutdown:  Opera versions and install methods vary as to where they place the cache files.  You can discover their location with Opera>MenuBar>Help>AboutOpera, in order to make sure that  files you don't want backed up are correctly listed in your /opt/.xfiletool.lst.

2)   If you want to lose them during a session:  Opera>MenuBar>Tools>DeletePrivateData is a tool for removing cookies, cache, etc. during a session, and it also makes possible the deletion of vulnerable email passwords before opening dodgy mail.  You can configure what is to be deleted.

(Bug note:  Opera versions before the most recent have to be closed and reopened for passwords to be effectively removed by this method.  Bug is fixed in 11.01.)


Correction to the above:  It seems I was being very naive about the nature of supercookies!  Have just spent some time googling "supercookie" I now doubt that the above  will deal with them at all.  I did find, however, several references about going to the Adobe website to get them removed/controlled...plus some other stuff that looked useful about locating them, plus now am understanding Tinypoodle's original answer much better.  Apologies for the "red herring"!

Regards,  Harnessmaker
« Last Edit: April 14, 2011, 12:42:50 PM by Harnessmaker »

Offline danielibarnes

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #22 on: April 14, 2011, 01:27:58 PM »
Could you post your .vmx please, that makes OSS work fine? 

I didn't do anything special. I just accepted all the defaults when creating my virtual machine. I suspect you may have more than one sound device and VMware Player is selecting the wrong one.
sound.present = "TRUE"
sound.fileName = "-1"
sound.autodetect = "TRUE"
sound.pciSlotNumber = "34"

Offline Ulysses_

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #23 on: April 14, 2011, 04:30:11 PM »
Still doesn't work (it sounds terrible) and the windows host only lists one sound device, a RealTek AC'97.  Tried the following too, but still the sound is terrible:

pciSound.priorityBoost = "TRUE"
sound.highPriority = "TRUE"

Then added the following from a vmware enthusiast's post, to no avail.

sound.maxLength = "2048"
sound.smallBlockSize = "1024"
sound.buffering = "10000000000.0"
sound.ignoreOverflows = "TRUE"
sound.copyDelayFactor = "1000000.0"
sound.virtualrealcorrection= "10000000000.0"
sound.directSound = "FALSE"

It remains to be seen how switching to a linux host would affect TC sound.  It seem a TC problem, all other linux'es I have VM's for sound perfect when playing youtube flash.

Offline danielibarnes

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Re: How does Opera do the equivalent of these?
« Reply #24 on: April 14, 2011, 04:46:22 PM »
Quote
Still doesn't work (it sounds terrible) and the windows host only lists one sound device, a RealTek AC'97.

try redirecting the audio output to a wave file and see if it still sounds badly. That will remove your windows audio card as a variable. If you have a USB audio device, you could try connecting to it within the VM.
« Last Edit: April 14, 2011, 04:50:18 PM by danielibarnes »