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Author Topic: File storage problem for TCL64  (Read 5015 times)

tinycorelinux

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File storage problem for TCL64
« on: November 20, 2020, 03:40:54 AM »
I would like to know how the data in all folders under the root directory is deleted after every system shutdown. How does this work? Using scripts? Change mount mode? Modifying kernel code? Now we need to customize our own operating system based on TCL, so we really want to know this, and This is the only question I can ask you, because these operating systems were developed by you, you know them better than others, thank you.

Offline Juanito

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Re: File storage problem for TCL64
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2020, 03:47:05 AM »
It’s not deleted - either it’s in ram and lost on shutdown or loop mounted and unmounted on shutdown.

tinycorelinux

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Re: File storage problem for TCL64
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2020, 03:51:56 AM »
in ram?How can we change this behavior?
I'm talking more about how do you get it to work the normal way like any other distribution?
« Last Edit: November 20, 2020, 04:02:13 AM by ONE »

Offline Juanito

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Re: File storage problem for TCL64
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2020, 03:59:46 AM »
Add the files you’d like to keep to your backup.

tinycorelinux

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Re: File storage problem for TCL64
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2020, 04:04:55 AM »
I don't think it's wise to do that, it doesn't suit the needs of most users...
Is it in your interest that I ask this question?
« Last Edit: November 20, 2020, 04:07:27 AM by ONE »

Offline xor

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Re: File storage problem for TCL64
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2020, 04:07:42 AM »
My guess :)
The system starts up, assuming there is always a backup directory.
If the routing directory is not created, the system will reset itself.
As such, permanence either occurs or does not occur, depending on the desire!

in ram?How can we change this behavior?
I'm talking more about how do you get it to work the normal way like any other distribution?

tinycorelinux

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Re: File storage problem for TCL64
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2020, 04:16:52 AM »
Your assumption is actually TCL's backup and restore principle, but that's not what I want to know.

tinycorelinux

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Re: File storage problem for TCL64
« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2020, 04:22:17 AM »
@All members of TinycoreLinux Team
If you think my question is going to touch your interests and your technology patents, Please tell me,I'll never ask it again.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2020, 04:25:38 AM by ONE »

Offline xor

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Re: File storage problem for TCL64
« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2020, 04:42:35 AM »
for permanence
Code: [Select]
tce-setdrive
in ram?How can we change this behavior?
I'm talking more about how do you get it to work the normal way like any other distribution?
« Last Edit: November 20, 2020, 04:46:43 AM by xor »

Offline Juanito

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Re: File storage problem for TCL64
« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2020, 04:53:48 AM »
You can install tinycore in traditional “scatter” mode.

Offline Rich

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Re: File storage problem for TCL64
« Reply #10 on: November 20, 2020, 05:30:57 AM »
Hi ONE
The root file system is RAM based.
It is provided by the  initrd  (core.gz).
It gets rebuilt from scratch every time you boot.
Here is a diagram of how it works:
http://distro.ibiblio.org/tinycorelinux/architecture.html
The only folders that can be permanent are  /home  and  /opt.
This is by design, and will not be changed.

in ram?How can we change this behavior?
I'm talking more about how do you get it to work the normal way like any other distribution?
By switching to any other distribution that works in the normal way.

You can install tinycore in traditional “scatter” mode.
If you go down this road, you are on your own.
We do not provide support for this mode of operation.
I don't know what other problems it will cause, but it will break the package manager.

tinycorelinux

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Re: File storage problem for TCL64
« Reply #11 on: November 20, 2020, 05:57:02 AM »
It’s not deleted - either it’s in ram and lost on shutdown or loop mounted and unmounted on shutdown.
"Scatter" mode?How I do?

tinycorelinux

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Re: File storage problem for TCL64
« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2020, 05:44:00 AM »
Following TCL's design philosophy, how do you solve the performance problem of creating a large number of file links? With the increasing amount of software installed on the machine, TCL needs to spend a lot of time to create a large number of links for all files in each mounted TCZ. Is there any way to solve this problem? I wonder if TCL Team has ever considered such a question?

Offline xor

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Re: File storage problem for TCL64
« Reply #13 on: November 21, 2020, 06:00:38 AM »
compressing files is a matter of preference
as it is not as fast as a regular hdd or ssd ram
I do not detect any lag time in between.

The system only reads the system files required at boot.
reads files on optional applications.
An optional auto save is created after the application or system shutdown request.

In summary, if we study the system; Applications that are subject to the literacy process of perhaps 1 million times,
How quickly you forget that system storage space is shortening its useful life! :)


Following TCL's design philosophy, how do you solve the performance problem of creating a large number of file links? With the increasing amount of software installed on the machine, TCL needs to spend a lot of time to create a large number of links for all files in each mounted TCZ. Is there any way to solve this problem? I wonder if TCL Team has ever considered such a question?

tinycorelinux

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Re: File storage problem for TCL64
« Reply #14 on: November 21, 2020, 07:02:51 AM »
The system only reads the system files required at boot.
reads files on optional applications.
However, the system needs to create links for all files in each mounted TCZ every time, so the startup speed is slow