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Author Topic: Univ. of Washington - saying no to nano  (Read 863 times)

Offline PDP-8

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Re: Univ. of Washington - saying no to nano
« Reply #15 on: August 06, 2020, 03:55:26 PM »
Well, we could get into a long discussion of how the dream of Multics / Plan 9 is already here for most of the population.  Or other minutae of software and hardware issues.

Look at where Rob Pike works.  And many other early *nix luminaries.

The original dream of the public having access to "data as a service", much like water, gas, electrical utilities up 24/7 in the 60's and late 70's has been achieved in a slightly different form.

Instead of using a teletype terminal attached to the wall jack, most of us see the browser as a terminal replacement, and ethernet / wireless have replaced the rs-232 data jack.

Instead of having the end-user store his files locally on paper-tape, it would have been stored in the GE-645 / Honeywell mainframes, all backboned together across the nation.  The user would have remote filesystems looking like it was local to him or her, when in fact it might be stored on a GE-645 mainframe across the country.

Security on multics truly needed specialized hardware to achieve it's goals of ring-security, but today one might think of a Yubi-Key or some other hardware dongle in addition to normal o/s security methods.

Today - can you say "cloud" - simply a reference to your files being remote on some other machine where you don't have to know or care.  Can you say "Google Drive" today?  In the Multics day, the plan was not to have users needing local paper-tape storage either.

So much so, that today the only thing a user deals with is a browser, and no need to know the innards of Multics / Plan 9 / or *nix whatsoever.

For most, that means the worry of "cat -v is harmful" is a quaint concern of history.

Heh, but not for us - the people who like to mess around with computing, the old-school way with minimal applications and tools to build tools. :)  I totally get what that organization's goals are, and if it matters to you (like it does me too) great.  Go for it.  But change the world?  Hardly.

But sure - go ahead and study Plan 9 for your own edification.  Great stuff.

When your bank / school / office or other organization demands you use a specific set of browsers, and one wants to argue about the Plan9 rc-shell being adequate for your needs, see how far you'll get. :)

I'm just saying it's all great stuff, but make no mistake - TinyCore isn't going to change the world.  However, it may bring great joy and enrichment to our lives as individuals.
That's a UNIX book! - cool  -- Garth

Offline jazzbiker

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Re: Univ. of Washington - saying no to nano
« Reply #16 on: August 06, 2020, 11:38:46 PM »
Oh, just a sad conclusion. You were reading this book for so long time, and You have a few pages unread, but You are certain, what will be the tale ending? Let's see some time later ;-) I hope that we will return to this thread in about a year. Running TinyCore 12!
Yes, I know, were Rob Pike works now, I've read his recent interview. This huge companies are exchanging people's confidence to dependencies (in a bad meaning) and further to manipilation, which is the form of violence. One moment people may encounter exchage rate unfair. In my opinion, corps are in a hurry, and i don't think, that the game score is predefined. Of course it's just an opinion :-)

And thanks for Your warning :-)