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Author Topic: Linux on new hardware?  (Read 1206 times)

Offline YoupMelon

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Linux on new hardware?
« on: October 02, 2017, 05:50:57 AM »
Hi all,

On what kind of hardware do you guys use TinyCore Linux?
Only old or crippled PCs etc? Or also modern Win10 prepared machines?
From internet support pages I have the impression that since a couple of years you basically can't just buy a PC and install your own OS on it anymore.
If that is true, why is there no loud howling from the computer people all over the internet, TV, newspapers, etc?
Otoh, if the above is exaggerated and it's still possible to install custom OSes on new hardware, be it perhaps with some effort:  how?

Offline curaga

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Re: Linux on new hardware?
« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2017, 12:49:09 AM »
I use a mix, but nothing bought in the last few years. If you worry about the Windows lock, buy a PC without an OS included (or with FreeDOS).
The only barriers that can stop you are the ones you create yourself.

Offline PDP-8

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Re: Linux on new hardware?
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2017, 06:48:40 PM »
Right now I'm using Tinycore Pure64 on an Acer AXC-704G-UW61 desktop with UEFI enabled.  Got it as a clean refurb with Win10 installed.

I was easily able to disable secure-boot.  It was also easy to disable UEFI and enable the CSM legacy bios compatability mode.  From what I understand, all the Acer bios' of the XC range are easily changed.  (except perhaps for the very lowest end model).

However, I actually re-enabled UEFI for use with TC Pure64, since it seems to be just *slightly* faster  in graphics than the older legacy bios mode.

Many thanks to the devs for making TC64 a hybrid!  Boots nicely no matter what mode I'm in, and right now I'm running solely from cd/dvd with a persistent usb store.  Later I'll make the usb-stick bootable.

Other EFI capable distros boot no problem, even from stick, but of course TC64 is my favorite.

I thought I was going to have to fight Acer, but in fact it was very easy to choose what mode you want to run.
cat -v Considered Harmful  -- Rob Pike

Offline coreplayer2

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Re: Linux on new hardware?
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2017, 02:57:58 PM »
Mostly the latest gear..  A recent edition to my systems is an ASUS Gaming Notebook, Core i7 (7th gen), 16 GB Ram, SSD, Nvidia GTX 1070.  & a 4k monitor via HDMI, UEFI multi boot & Secure Boot disabled to run Tinycore and Corepure64.  I think hardware manufacturers would be shooting themselves in the foot without providing a means to overide features designed for the corporate world.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2017, 03:05:18 PM by coreplayer2 »

Offline NewUser

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Re: Linux on new hardware?
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2017, 08:26:58 PM »
I have it installed on a newish Dell XPS 13 (321L?). Works a treat, as they say.

    [EDIT]: Changed Jewish to newish.  Rich
« Last Edit: December 12, 2017, 09:19:50 PM by Rich »

Offline Rich

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Re: Linux on new hardware?
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2017, 08:46:48 PM »
Hi NewUser
I have it installed on a Jewish Dell XPS 13 (321L?). Works a treat, as they say.
I didn't know that computer hardware was available in different religious denominations.

Offline NewUser

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Re: Linux on new hardware?
« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2017, 09:04:08 PM »
Oh, crap. Of course I meant newish, not the other. Can that be edited? Please?

Offline Rich

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Re: Linux on new hardware?
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2017, 09:16:57 PM »
Hi NewUser
I'll edit and fix yours. I'm leaving mine because it's actually pretty funny. What happened, auto-correct?

Offline NewUser

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Re: Linux on new hardware?
« Reply #8 on: December 12, 2017, 09:56:18 PM »
Hi NewUser
I'll edit and fix yours. I'm leaving mine because it's actually pretty funny. What happened, auto-correct?
Thanks, Rich. It must have been autocorrect. At the time I was using Edge on a Surface tablet.

Offline PDP-8

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Re: Linux on new hardware?
« Reply #9 on: December 15, 2017, 01:36:56 AM »
The irony with TC is that with the brand new low-budget desktop I bought just for it, is total overkill for what I do making it a screamer!

I'm running the 32 bit version of TC on a 64 bit box with 4gb ram, purposely wasting 2gb of it!  According to HTOP, I'm really pushing the envelope with about 65-70mb ram during heavy use. :)

  It smokes for what I do with it.  Of course, with Windows 10 it is an underpowered, underperforming sluggish box with ho-hum reviews. I did a dd wipe of the drive after about 2 hours of playing with windows.  Ugh.

So don't think TC is just for old hardware.  Put it on something new, even a low-budget desktop.  TC's ideals kind of transcends the whole hardware issue..
« Last Edit: December 15, 2017, 01:40:31 AM by PDP-8 »
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Offline chattrhand

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Re: Linux on new hardware?
« Reply #10 on: January 06, 2018, 08:52:12 AM »
TinyCore is running on a broad spectrum of machines from the very very young to the very very old, if there is only a CD drive and/or a USB port.

The main advantage for me is the easy building of multi-boot multi-purpose installations on the same USB-Stick I can start it on every box leaving no tracks if I take care of. One can boot directly, but also in a VM. (I did not try it until now)

It is fine if you sometimes need passwords for online access. It is also fine if you are handling encrypted files. You can plug out your confidential stick if you actually do not need it and so avoid to expose it to the crackers grasping through your browser..

And it is fast. Even on old Apples with USB2 only.

I also tried full sized desktop Linuxes like Ubuntu or LM or even Manjaro. They are very fine if installed on hard disk, but from USB-Stick they are much too lame.

greetings
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