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Offline jriker1

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persistence
« on: January 09, 2017, 06:43:17 AM »
I assume "microcore" is the base core OS however I have installed Core (no GUI version) on a virtual machine, but looks like everytime I reboot or do something, not sure what yet, everything vanishes.  Looks like every single think I do shows up as some kind of device.  So after installing say a compiler and type "df" there are loads of devices with the names of all the installed packages.  Is there any way to make all of Core persistent?

Thanks.

JR

Online polikuo

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Re: persistence
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2017, 07:05:45 AM »
Make sure you have tiny core installed on the drive, tiny core loads every thing in the RAM.
Do filetool.sh -bv to backup the system before you reboot.
You might find this helpful http://tinycorelinux.net/book.html

Offline coreplayer2

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Re: persistence
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2017, 07:19:55 AM »
Welcome jriker1

core (not microcore) is the base for a command line install

  • For a command line install; use Core-7.2.iso as base install
  • For a graphical (desktop) environment; use TinyCore-7.2.iso as base install

create a tce directory (/tce/optional) on the virtual drive to install extensions which are loop mounted on next boot.
As polikuo recommends, all the answers are in the book



Offline Misalf

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Re: persistence
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2017, 07:21:06 AM »
"Micro Core" is now just "Core".
If installed to hard disk, Core will  not  copy everything to RAM by default. Instead, extensions (installed applications) are loop mounted. That's what you see with  df .
Yes, you can make your customizations persistent.
However, your home directory and the root file system is in RAM by default, so each file you want to preserve needs to be explicitly specified in  /opt/.filetool.lst  and the  backup  command needs to be used before rebooting.
Download a copy and keep it handy: Core book ;)

Offline jriker1

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Re: persistence
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2017, 08:35:42 AM »
Thanks. Wow manually backing up to.  Missed that part.  Guess this OS isn't meant for frequent changes huh?  Which technically is part of my goal anyway once done.

JR

Offline coreplayer2

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Re: persistence
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2017, 08:51:29 AM »
You can make as many changes as you like.  Just have to add changed files to the backup (if a backup is used).  iirc you can also simply type " backup "  after adding changed files


Offline jriker1

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Re: persistence
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2017, 09:22:14 AM »
Just typing backup.  Does that backup the whole drive or just what's still in the filelist?

Offline Misalf

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Re: persistence
« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2017, 09:43:17 AM »
Only entries from  /opt/.filetool.lst  are included in the backup file (/etc/sysconfig/tcedir/mydata.tgz).
Download a copy and keep it handy: Core book ;)

Online bmarkus

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Re: persistence
« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2017, 09:48:24 AM »
Only entries from  /opt/.filetool.lst  are included in the backup file (/etc/sysconfig/tcedir/mydata.tgz).

Minus .xfiletool.lst
Béla
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Offline curaga

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Re: persistence
« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2017, 01:41:14 AM »
It's automatic when using the GUI, but on the command-line it's assumed people know what they're doing.
The only barriers that can stop you are the ones you create yourself.