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Author Topic: Where is your Linux home?  (Read 14780 times)

Offline skipshearer

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Re: Where is your Linux home?
« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2008, 08:03:12 PM »
On my main workhorse I run XP for video work (need Adobe Premiere, although am starting to work with kino) and Ubuntu Hardy for everything else.

Gateway Profile 1 I run DSL (frugal), Mint Fluxbox and Puppy. Will be adding TCL soon!! :D

Compaq profile PIII laptop Fedora 10, suse 11, ubuntu 8.10, DSL, Mint XFCE. Again, TCL will be added.  ;D

DSL was the distro I cut my linux teeth on. I think TCL is gonna be even more fun.

Offline bugman

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Re: Where is your Linux home?
« Reply #16 on: December 21, 2008, 11:39:57 AM »
puppy 1.07 [old kernel for scanner compatibility]

tho i have dynebolic on here [p3-550, 384 mb] too, and am going to experiment with tiny core as soon as possible


Offline rayburn

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Re: Where is your Linux home?
« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2009, 03:41:40 PM »
Hope it is not too late too reply to this topic!

Anyway, I use AntiX mostly on my main PC, with Ubuntu also installed so that I can use my scanner/printer and also stuff like Frostwire, etc. Several other distros are also installed like Absolute and Debian.

I have two other PC's in the house for other family members and they have Xubuntu/Mint installed, I am pleased that I have got daughters/wife into using Linux!

Main laptop has XP/Fluxbuntu installed, while EeePC 701 has the original Xandros plus EeeOS on an SD card.

Two more experimental PC's have a minimal Debian and TC of course!

Offline lordtangent

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Re: Where is your Linux home?
« Reply #18 on: March 20, 2009, 01:12:01 PM »
Xubuntu and Kubuntu on my two home machines.   A couple of  envs/partitions for gentoo. Gentoo is my preferred development  env. I keep it pretty pristine and install only the bare minimum over the base distro there.

 Centos w/KDE  at work. That is really where I put in the bulk of my Linux time. 60 hours a week... :'(

Offline mikshaw

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Re: Where is your Linux home?
« Reply #19 on: March 20, 2009, 05:02:29 PM »
i have dynebolic on here [p3-550, 384 mb] too
I tried Dyne:Bolic 2.5.2 for a very brief time, and it really annoyed me...several apps would either freeze or just shut down for no apparent reason.  I recently switched to Pure:Dyne, which so far hasn't caused any trouble.  I wonder if my problems with Dynebolic were just me, but it seemed ridiculous the amount of trouble I was having with it.

Offline fos

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Re: Where is your Linux home?
« Reply #20 on: March 21, 2009, 10:25:01 AM »
I am new to tinycore. I was faroutscience over in DSL land.

I just downloaded tinycore. I am a big fan of Robert's work and philosophy.

The system I am currently using had Debian Etch installed primarily. It is running on an old box with a Via m1000 motherboard, with 500 mb of ram, and a Hitachi Travelstar hard drive. It must be at least four years old. As long as I run linux, it is very happy, as am I.

Since I am a grad student at a windows centric university, I also have a box running Windows. Most of the work I turn in MUST be submitted in some windows based format. :(

As time permits, I hope to become active here.

Jeff

PS. I just ran TinyCore for the first time. It is blazzing fast! And, it has a familiar feel to it.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2009, 11:14:25 AM by fos »

Offline nickispeaki

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Re: Where is your Linux home?
« Reply #21 on: April 09, 2009, 06:26:36 AM »
cpm, msdos, win, mac,win, linux
Ubuntu 6, LinuxMint 2.1
for now LinuxMint 6 (main), Mint 4 (for case), ASPLinux 12 (for other case), iDeneb (macOSX.5.5) for special case and windows 7 for .... windows! ;-)

I like TCL for speed and minimalizm!

Offline junan

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Re: Where is your Linux home?
« Reply #22 on: May 13, 2009, 11:31:37 PM »
P4-2.8 Laptop : - CentOS 5.3 , Windows XP - because i need a program that not wine compatible :(
                            - and TinyCoreLinux ... i hate to wait for booting @ centos / xp just to write e-mail

AMD X2 Desktop : - CentOS 5.3 , Fedora 10 ...
fun and fearless ...

Offline PingPing

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Re: Where is your Linux home?
« Reply #23 on: May 19, 2009, 01:57:39 PM »
Bog standard Ubuntu install on my desktop and netbook.  I like it because it (generally) just works and I don't have to spend time figuring things out if I'm in a rush.  I use CentOS on my home server because I have delusions of grandeur thinking I'll someday be a RHCE.  I use a remastered, text-only version of Tiny on my web server because I love the fact that it's so small and maleable.  Props to the devs :thumbsup:

Offline PingPing

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Re: Where is your Linux home?
« Reply #24 on: June 25, 2009, 01:21:42 PM »
I've kicked CentOS.  TCL 2.0 is now my home web and samba server.

Offline philip

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Re: Where is your Linux home?
« Reply #25 on: August 14, 2009, 09:38:17 PM »
Ubuntu 9.04 running headless under the basement stairs serves my home network.

Two Compaq Evo T20 thin clients run TC+FLWM with just enough extensions to serve as VNC viewers. The units are diskless; each has a 1GB USB drive plugged in the back permanently to store TCE files. Each drives a 1280x1024 LCD monitor, and the admirable 'synergy' extension lets me use a single keyboard and mouse to
work both at once. These little boxes get the TC kernel and initrd over the network, having only grub loaded into their small internal flash memory.

Across the room is another VNC-based thin client running TC 2.2, but on better hardware (Intel D945GCLF2D board with northbridge fan replaced by passive cooler). That one has the TC kernel and extensions on its internal hard disk drive, all in TCE style so that after boot I can turn the drive off using hdparm and have a silent system.

My Acer Aspire One netbook dual-boots TC 2.2 and Ubuntu 9.04. At home I choose TC because it has scripts that make a wireless connection (VNC again) to the main server completely automatically. On the road I use Ubuntu because it has the full suite of specialized software I need to get work done when there is no more powerful CPU I can access effortlessly. (Also, introducing the little toy to a new wireless network is easier with Ubuntu's GUI tools.)

My office machine is running TC+VNC, too, but it boots from a USB key that I plug in only long enough to boot and then remove. In an earlier TC installation some evildoer installed a rootkit on my machine--which was at that time directly connected to the open internet with no firewall. Yanking the boot device out of the box now gives me
reasonable confidence that my system is hardened against outside interference. Then I leave the machine running continuously between TC version updates (which, so far, has been under a month each time!).

The 915resolution extension is essential for me: I have a couple of widescreen monitors that even work with Xvesa after the right 915resolution commands are given.

To answer the OP's question, the HDD space for operating systems in my machines is about 98% Ubuntu, 2% TC. In my heart, TC gets 60% of the love; Ubuntu gets 40% for respect and vanilla utility.

Offline Dark_Aaron

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Re: Where is your Linux home?
« Reply #26 on: September 26, 2009, 04:10:28 PM »
Desktop => Ubuntu 9.04 (Awful)
Laptop => Ubuntu 9.04 (TC in a VM.)
Servers => Debian lenny
ps3 => fedora

I'm going to replace the ubuntu soon. (Does TC support dual-screens? I have 2x22" Monitors.)
I also use XP in a vm. (I've only had few successes with GTK-POD.)

Offline curaga

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Re: Where is your Linux home?
« Reply #27 on: September 27, 2009, 03:40:09 AM »
Does TC support dual-screens? I have 2x22" Monitors.
With Xorg yes, with Xvesa you only get mirror mode (same resolution, refresh, and contents on both screens)
The only barriers that can stop you are the ones you create yourself.