Tiny Core Linux

Tiny Core Base => Corepure64 => Topic started by: minux on July 25, 2020, 11:18:34 PM

Title: [Solved] Many questions for TCL/CP64
Post by: minux on July 25, 2020, 11:18:34 PM
hi friends! First of all, thank you very much for helping me all the time.

Once again, my English is not good. If there are any grammatical mistakes or confusion in what I have said, please let  me know and forgive me.Thank you again.

Q1: Do all systems load themselves into RAM? What does a typical Linux distribution or Windows do?What's the difference between mount and Copy to Ram?
"Tiny Core loads itself into RAM from storage,  then mounts applications on storage, or installs applications to RAM from storage. An extension is said to be loaded or installed regardless of the method used (mount vs. copy to RAM). "

Q2: How to perform a traditional, hard-drive installation of the operating system?
"Tiny Core is different because users are not encouraged to perform a traditional, hard-drive installation of the operating system"

Q3: Running from RAM? Can you run it from anywhere else? Are other operating systems the same?
"but Tiny Core is designed to  run from a RAM copy created at boot time. "

Combined with the above three questions, I'm actually asking how to make TinyCore run the traditional way like other Linux or Windows systems, instead of copying the entire system to the RAM at boot time, loading the application (*.tce) into memory and running it from memory, which is not suitable for everyone.


Title: Re: Many questions for TCL/CP64
Post by: Juanito on July 25, 2020, 11:34:31 PM
Tinycore does not load the *tcz extensions into ram.

Tinycore loop mounts the *tcz extensions from permanent storage and symlinks them into the root file system in ram - this results in a ram overhead of a few kb per extension.

The situation is analogous to running applications from an extremely fast cd/dvd drive.
Title: Re: Many questions for TCL/CP64
Post by: Rich on July 25, 2020, 11:49:59 PM
Hi NOOB
... "Tiny Core loads itself into RAM from storage,   ...
The initrd (corepure64.gz) contains a minimal file system that gets loaded into RAM. /mnt is in RAM. Drives get mounted under  /mnt
which serves as a connection point for the drive and uses very little RAM.

Quote
... then mounts applications on storage ...
Extensions are read only compressed file systems. Like a drive, they get mounted to make them accessible. Once mounted, their files
get connected to subdirectories under  /usr  using soft links. Soft links occupy about 40 bytes.

Quote
... I'm actually asking how to make TinyCore run the traditional way like other Linux or Windows systems ...
Tinycore is not designed to run that way. If that is what you want, you should look at a traditional Linux distro.
Title: Re: Many questions for TCL/CP64
Post by: minux on July 26, 2020, 12:00:54 AM
ļ¼ Juanito
If so, the system should unzip the program at install time (*.tce) and put it on hard disk instead of every time the program is first loaded, which makes me feel very slow...
Title: Re: Many questions for TCL/CP64
Post by: PDP-8 on July 26, 2020, 12:13:38 AM
I agree with Rich in regards to you wanting to change the way the *cores work.  They are supposed to be different for those of us who LIKE doing things with a little bit of legwork on our own.

Quickly straying OT, and I won't dwell on it after this message.

Both you and the former anyHUMANuser seem bent on trying to convince the community that TC is too hard, and would like to turn the *cores into easy-to-use general-purpose distributions.  It is easy, it all depends on your perspective.

What I can heartily recommend for that is a distro that I use on occasion - the X86/64 Rasperry Pi Desktop - not meant for the rpi boards, but for more normal desktop systems.

https://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads/raspberry-pi-desktop/

They have gone to great lengths to make the user interface as humanly friendly as possible, with a forum to match.

But that doesn't mean it's meant only for children either.  The human-interface type stuff you want for the most common tasks is easy to accomplish.

I believe you and anyhumanuser (and even myself at times) would find their hard work worthy of your attention.

Right tool for the right job, right?

.... sorry to be so OT - last time I'll mention this ...
Title: Re: Many questions for TCL/CP64
Post by: Juanito on July 26, 2020, 12:18:34 AM
If so, the system should unzip the program at install time (*.tce) and put it on hard disk instead of every time the program is first loaded, which makes me feel very slow...

If you'd like to check why tinycore does not do this, load tinycore and debian on an old machine and see just how much faster tinycore is.
Title: Re: Many questions for TCL/CP64
Post by: minux on July 26, 2020, 12:31:34 AM
@Rich
Does the same apply to other programs? For example *. Deb, *. RPM, *.Appimage, *. Tar. gz... Or is it just *.tcz?
Quote from: Rich link=topic=24110.msg152175#msg152175  date=1595746199
Extensions are read only compressed file systems. Like a drive, they get mounted to make them accessible. Once mounted, their files get connected to subdirectories under  /usr  using soft links. Soft links occupy about 40 bytes.
Title: Re: Many questions for TCL/CP64
Post by: Juanito on July 26, 2020, 12:48:16 AM
Only *tcz.
Title: Re: Many questions for TCL/CP64
Post by: minux on July 26, 2020, 12:48:55 AM
@PDP-8
Thank you for your recommendation. I'm sure I'll take a look.
What I can heartily recommend for that is a distro that I use on occasion - the X86/64 Rasperry Pi Desktop - not meant for the rpi boards, but for more normal desktop systems.

Quote
I believe you and anyhumanuser (and even myself at times) would find their hard work worthy of your attention.
Thank them for their efforts.
Title: Re: Many questions for TCL/CP64
Post by: minux on July 26, 2020, 12:51:50 AM
@Juanito I see,so that's it.
If you'd like to check why tinycore does not do this, load tinycore and debian on an old machine and see just how much faster tinycore is.
Title: Re: Many questions for TCL/CP64
Post by: minux on July 26, 2020, 04:09:44 AM
Q4: how to install chrome("https://www.chrome64bit.com/index.php/google-chrome-64-bit-for-linux")? not chrome.tcz.
Many applications published with *.tar.gz or others package compacted, Should I install them?
Title: Re: Many questions for TCL/CP64
Post by: Juanito on July 26, 2020, 04:40:45 AM
There's a chromium browser extension in the CorePure64 repo.

Typically *tar.gz packages need to be compiled then installed although some may be precompiled.
Title: Re: Many questions for TCL/CP64
Post by: Sashank999 on July 26, 2020, 04:59:35 AM
.tar.gz packages are usually called as sources or tarballs or release tarballs. These have the uncompiled program in it. We can compile it using the traditional autotools(autoconf, automake, etc.) or cmake or some other tools.

Some .tar.gz might be binary releases. These are precompiled programs. You can download these if you want the application to work but they aren't compatible with some devices and hence not suited for packaging into tcz or submitting to repo.

Chrome is not open source and hence not available in repo. However, there are Chromium and Firefox. As Chrome is known(IMO) to be collecting private data and selling it, I personally prefer Firefox. Just get firefox_getLatest.tcz and run it.
Title: Re: Many questions for TCL/CP64
Post by: PDP-8 on July 26, 2020, 05:29:21 AM
Sashank - no take it all the way and start making TC into a flutter app box!  :(

Seems like a concerted effort to *avoid* TCZ's for some reason that I don't understand.
Title: Re: Many questions for TCL/CP64
Post by: Sashank999 on July 26, 2020, 07:24:35 PM
I am sorry but I don't understand what you are saying.
Title: [Solved] Re: Many questions for TCL/CP64
Post by: PDP-8 on July 26, 2020, 09:22:04 PM
Sashank - We're good.  I think the op can't make the connect that sure, we can all run other package formats, but the point is not to stop there!

The next step of course is to refine and repackage into a TCZ with our easily available tools so that the package better fits the infrastructure needs specific to the TC project itself.

The same could be said of Slitaz or any number of small distros that have their own package formats for technical reasons.  Otherwise, just run Slackware or any other major distro.

Anyway, I'll drop my thread response..