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Author Topic: Linux on an 8-bit micro  (Read 366 times)

Offline uggla

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Linux on an 8-bit micro
« on: April 01, 2012, 05:49:57 AM »
Read about this on osnews.com, perhaps something for TC? It would be kind of cool. 8)

http://dmitry.co/index.php?p=./04.Thoughts/07.%20Linux%20on%208bit

Offline gutmensch

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Re: Linux on an 8-bit micro
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2012, 06:12:18 AM »
Quote
uARM is certainly no speed demon. It takes about 2 hours to boot to bash prompt ("init=/bin/bash" kernel command line). Then 4 more hours to boot up the entire Ubuntu ("exec init" and then login). Starting X takes a lot longer.
great piece of work but also a bit hilarious IMHO ;)
If I seem unduly clear to you, you must have misunderstood what I said. (Alan Greenspan)

Online bmarkus

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Re: Linux on an 8-bit micro
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2012, 06:14:21 AM »
Oh, it's 1st of April. Lets have a fun :)

Running an ARM emulator on 8-bit uC and than boot UBUNTU.

- Is it cool? Yes.
- Is it good to create? For sure, for its creator.
- Is there a practical use? No.

But that's right.

Quote
uARM is certainly no speed demon. It takes about 2 hours to boot to bash prompt ("init=/bin/bash" kernel command line). Then 4 more hours to boot up the entire Ubuntu ("exec init" and then login). Starting X takes a lot longer. The effective emulated CPU speed is about 6.5KHz, which is on par with what you'd expect emulating a 32-bit CPU & MMU on a measly 8-bit micro. Curiously enough, once booted, the system is somewhat usable. You can type a command and get a reply within a minute. That is to say that you can, in fact, use it. I used it to day to format an SD card, for example. This is definitely not the fastest, but I think it may be the cheapest, slowest, simplest to hand assemble, lowest part count, and lowest-end Linux PC. The board is hand-soldered using wires, there is not even a requirement for a printed circuit board.

Thanks, I like it :) I enjoyed reading it.

Béla
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"Amateur Radio: The First Technology-Based Social Network."

Offline gutmensch

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Re: Linux on an 8-bit micro
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2012, 06:15:44 AM »
btw. beware of electricity failures D'OH reboot.
If I seem unduly clear to you, you must have misunderstood what I said. (Alan Greenspan)