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Author Topic: Archlinux PKGBUILD  (Read 868 times)

Offline b1ackmai1er

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Archlinux PKGBUILD
« on: March 19, 2012, 02:37:00 AM »
Hi Everyone,

Is there an easy way to compile programs using Archlinux PKGBUILD files like this:

https://aur.archlinux.org/packages.php?ID=53691&comments=all
https://aur.archlinux.org/packages/lo/logitechmediaserver/PKGBUILD

Thanks

Offline vinnie

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Re: Archlinux PKGBUILD
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2012, 04:01:55 PM »
It would be nice, aur system is one of the things that I envy to arch

Offline Jason W

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Re: Archlinux PKGBUILD
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2012, 06:36:31 PM »
To use any package manager from another distro, they rely on an installed package database.  Which basically means to make that package manager useful, you would need to have a system that has all the needed dependency packages installed by that package manager to make it useful.  Having tcz's installed would not be recognized by another package manager even if the actual library or build dependencies are installed via tczs.  Package managers like Arch's or most any other - as well as TC - rely on a database of installed packages that were installed via that particular package manager to determine if dependencies have been met.

In other words, you pretty much need to be running a particular distro to make use of it's package manager without running into loads of issues.

On the other hand I generally use Arch Linux PKGBUILD files, and also Slackbuilds, to base my own build scripts off of, and for that those files are very useful. but that is a lot different than actually using another distro's package manager. 

Offline b1ackmai1er

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Re: Archlinux PKGBUILD
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2012, 02:04:14 AM »
Hi Thanks guys,

It wasn't so much that I want to use the package manager facilities from Arch but find a way to compile the files using the script in the PKGBUILD file. Then I could package it as a tcz.

I thought I read that the PKGBUILD file was a bash script and I was hoping that I could setup the TC compile environment and then feed the PCKBUILD file into bash to compile the program and it's dependencies.

Regards

Offline solorin

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Re: Archlinux PKGBUILD
« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2012, 05:16:41 PM »
There are extension making script systems like this for tinycore in the scripting and programming section of the forum.

Will we ever see one of those systems selected as an official one? Are there technical reasons why this couldn't happen?

That might be nice as it
1) would make user-contributed packages easier to package.
2) allow the possibilty of signed packages for the official repository.
3) allow the creation on an unofficial one which just contains build scripts and source tarballs (much like AUR).

I know everyone has there own way of doing things, but why waste the effort?

My comments are only motivated by wanting to see tinycore world domination.

cheerio,
solorin
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Offline vinnie

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Re: Archlinux PKGBUILD
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2012, 04:01:37 AM »
I think it's a decision that involves a lot of work, if it will be taken into consideration (and, quoting at first, I'd like) I think it be a slow process.

First of all they should standardize the process of creating scripts (surely the team tinycore would do a great job, but it is meticulous work).

Secondly, what makes AUR so great is the management system:
Being able to search for packages with different criteria, look at the script, comment, vote ... is how to create a second comunity internal to the main.
I think the packager in addition to having an advantage they also have fun!

But all that I could wait as the subject of a major new release, because it is really hard.