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Samsung Unified Linux driver + CLX-3185 + TC CUPS-strategy

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Rich:
Hi Yleisajattelija
While it makes sense to use ash for TC scripts since it is part of busybox, the same is not necessarily true of a
package you wish to compile. Rather than fight with the package, I'd recommend you install the bash extension.
It's only needed to build the package, not for the final extension. Awk is also a part of busybox and can be called
from a script.

xyz-worx:
Hi Yleisajattelija,

if you don't like to install bash.tcz you can try to modify the building script(s).
I did compile several packages e. g. from git-repositories, where scripts normally have the
#/bin/bash  shebang

Changing these lines to
#/bin/sh
did work.

Maybe it is even enough to do this only in the 'configure' script.
Together with 'compiletc' - as Rich stated - the compilation should be possible.

regards
xyz-worx

tinypoodle:

--- Quote from: xyz-worx on April 29, 2012, 11:49:02 PM ---Hi Yleisajattelija,

if you don't like to install bash.tcz you can try to modify the building script(s).
I did compile several packages e. g. from git-repositories, where scripts normally have the
#/bin/bash  shebang

Changing these lines to
#/bin/sh
did work.

--- End quote ---

...which is an indication that they are wrongly declared in header in the first place.
Would be a good idea to report such uptime so it can get fixed.

Yleisajattelija:
The point is, bash is "evil code". I like to get rid of it. It it good example of "unix disease", unnecessary complexity is ruining everything.

Awk is indeend part of the basebox, so let it be default, if ash won't be solution.

a) busybox (not gnu-utils)
b) compiletc.tcz (not c++)
c) ash (not bash)
d) awk (not gawk) only lethal cases, when need to heavy string processing or/and arithmetic
e) nothing else .

Yleisajattelija:
Sane backends source README file says (sorry for long listing):

Where can i find those "TC PPI-compatibility"  rules for sane libs and udev rule files?

---------------------------------------------
Read the file README and this file.

Install missing development packages with your prefered package manager:
  libusb-dev

Search the location where your system installed libsane.so.1.
  Each distribution uses different folders for the libraries.
 
  Here are some examples from 64 bit Ubuntu 10.04. For the installation process
  you need to replace /usr/lib with the folder detected on your system.
 
  $ sudo find / -name libsane.so.1
  /usr/lib/libsane.so.1

  /usr/lib is the folder we are looking for.
 
  Be careful on 64 bit systems, if you already installed 32 bit compatibility
    libraries, e.g. the package ia32-libs:

    $ sudo find / -name libsane.so.1
    /usr/lib/libsane.so.1
    /usr/lib32/libsane.so.1
   
    This response contains 2 folders: (1) /usr/lib32 is the location of the
    32 bit compatibility libraries. (2) /usr/lib is the folder we are looking
    for.
   
  Be careful, if you already compiled and installed new SANE backend:
   
    $ sudo find / -name libsane.so.1
    /usr/lib/libsane.so.1
    /usr/local/lib/libsane.so.1
    /home/user/src/sane-backends/backend/.libs/libsane.so.1

    This response contains 3 folders: (1) /usr/local/lib is the location of
    installed new SANE backend. (2) /home/user/src/sane-backends/backend/.libs
    is the location of compiled new SANE backend in the source tree.
    (3) /usr/lib is the folder we are looking for.
 
Decide where you want to install new libsane.
  You can set symbolic links to new libsane.
    I assume that new libsane version 1.0.23 will be installed to
    /usr/local/lib and your system installed libsane.so.1 to /usr/lib.

    $ cd /usr/lib
    $ sudo ln -sf /usr/local/lib/libsane.so.1.0.23 libsane.so.1
    $ sudo ln -sf /usr/local/lib/sane/libsane.la libsane.la
    $ cd -
Alternatively you can overwrite standard libsane.
    Then you need to do some extra configuration for latest SANE backend:
   
    $ ./configure --libdir="/usr/lib"
   
You also can replace the binaries, configuration, manuals, translations, etc.
  of your distribution. For more information please read:
 
  $ ./configure --help

Configure, make and install latest SANE backend.

  $ ./configure [with your options defined above]
  $ make && sudo make install

Use the scanner with normal user rights.
  This only works if udev is installed. Please note that historically not all
  of the distributions have used the same format for the udev rules file.
 
  Copy udev rules file:
 
  $ sudo cp tools/udev/libsane.rules /etc/udev/rules.d
 
  Reconnect your scanner to the USB bus to activate the new rules file.
 
  Your user must be a member of the group scanner. Please use the system tools
  to check, if this group exists, if needed create this group and join this
  group. After this you must logoff and login again.

Test your scanner.
  First you should check if new libsane is used.
 
    $ scanimage -V
    scanimage (sane-backends) 1.0.23git; backend version 1.0.23
 
    This example shows that backend and scanimage are version 1.0.23.
 
    $ /usr/bin/scanimage -V
    scanimage (sane-backends) 1.0.20; backend version 1.0.23
 
    This example shows that an old scanimage (1.0.20) uses the backend 1.0.23.
 
    If you want to use xsane, start xsane and check the used version with
    CTRL - i.
   
  Now you can test if your scanner is recognized with normal user rights.
 
    $ scanimage -L
   
    If your scanner isn't recognized here, try this:

      $ sudo scanimage -L
   
        If this works, your user doesn't have the rights to access the scanner.

      However, please check and redo the installation steps described above. 
      If this doesn't help, you can ask the mailing list 
      <sane-devel@lists.alioth.debian.org> for further support.
   
Have a lot of fun with the latest SANE backend.
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